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dc.contributor.advisorWalter, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKerby, Georgia
dc.date.available2017-05-17T02:17:20Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationKerby, G. (2017). Redcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7325
dc.description.abstractOver 140 years of excavation events at the Redcliffs site complex on the edge of Ihutai, Canterbury, has resulted in a unique material culture collection in Canterbury Museum. The site complex’s physical setting is located with easy access to a large range of resources, inland access routes, and shelter on Canterbury’s east coast. However, it lay directly on the shores of a highly dynamic microtidal estuary, which was an open bay upon first Māori arrival to the area and has likely influenced past patterns of settlement and the preservation of the local archaeological record. This thesis has achieved two outcomes. The first was the organisation and synthesis of the archaeological history of the Redcliffs site complex, from 1865-2003, in order to recognise the state and availability of Redcliffs archaeological information for future studies. The second was the production of an artefact inventory and description of the Redcliffs site complex material culture collection based on records in Canterbury Museum. This work supports that Redcliffs was the host of several temporary camps during winter spanning the mid to late 14th century AD to the early 16th century AD. Rather than Redcliffs being simply a ‘Moa Hunter’ camp, as it is often described, it was the locus of broad scale and opportunistic hunter gatherer practices, with a focus on fishing, shellfish collection, and fowling. Moncks Cave’s material culture showed some distinctions to that of the rest of the site complex which, with what is previously known about its faunal record, reveals that large scale cultural changes were taking place between AD1400 to AD1500 in relation to the decline of moa and seal and likely local geomorphological fluctuations. While many more aspects of Redcliffs life need further investigation, particularly the site complex’s chronology, the Redcliffs site complex’s material culture and especially its organic artefacts have revealed a more detailed and realistic image of Māori everyday life during the earliest periods of settlement than previously seen in Aotearoa.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectMaterial Culture
dc.subjectMoa Bone Point Cave
dc.subjectMoncks Cave
dc.subjectRedcliffs Flat
dc.subjectRedcliffs
dc.subjectSumner Burial Ground
dc.subjectSumner Cutting
dc.subjectMaori Prehistory
dc.subjectOrganic Artefacts
dc.subjectSumner
dc.subjectArchaic
dc.subjectMaori
dc.subjectAotearoa
dc.subjectCanterbury Museum
dc.subjectHistoric Records
dc.subjectRoger Duff
dc.subjectMichael Trotter
dc.subjectChris Jacomb
dc.subjectJunior Archaeological Club
dc.subjectSelwyn Hovell
dc.subjectWooden Artefacts
dc.subjectCulture Change
dc.subjectGeomorphological
dc.subjectSouthshore Spit
dc.subjectMoa Bone
dc.subjectMidden
dc.subjectSite Complex
dc.subjectFourteenth Century
dc.subjectFifteenth Century
dc.subjectSixteenth Century
dc.subjectTranisitonal
dc.subjectBird Spear Point
dc.subjectWaka
dc.subjectOutrigger Float
dc.subjectMoa Hunter
dc.subjectJulius von Haast
dc.subjectMcKay
dc.subjectInventory
dc.subjectWinter Camp
dc.subjectAvon-Heathcote Estuary
dc.subjectIhutai
dc.titleRedcliffs Archaeological History and Material Culture
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-05-17T01:19:29Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
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