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dc.contributor.authorTheodore, Reremoana
dc.contributor.authorTaumoepeau, Mele
dc.contributor.authorKokaua, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorTustin, Karen
dc.contributor.authorGollop, Megan
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Jackie
dc.contributor.authorKiro, Cynthia
dc.contributor.authorPoulton, Richie
dc.date.available2017-07-09T21:23:44Z
dc.date.copyright2017-07-03
dc.identifier.citationTheodore, R., Taumoepeau, M., Kokaua, J., Tustin, K., Gollop, M., Taylor, N., … Poulton, R. (2017). Equity in New Zealand university graduate outcomes: Māori and Pacific graduates. Higher Education Research and Development. doi:10.1080/07294360.2017.1344198en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7432
dc.description.abstractHigher education confers significant private and social benefits. Māori and Pacific peoples are under-represented within New Zealand universities and have poorer labour market outcomes (e.g., lower wages, under-represented in skilled professions). A New Zealand tertiary education priority is to boost Māori and Pacific success in an effort to improve outcomes for these graduates, their communities and society in general. Using information collected in the Graduate Longitudinal Study New Zealand, we compared Māori and Pacific university graduate outcomes with outcomes of other New Zealand graduates. Data were collected when the participants were in their final year of study (n = 8719) and two years post-graduation (n = 6104). Employment outcomes were comparable between Māori, Pacific and other New Zealand graduates at two years post-graduation; however, Māori and Pacific graduates had significantly higher student debt burden and financial strain over time. They were significantly more likely to help others (e.g., family) across a range of situations (e.g., lending money), and reported higher levels of volunteerism compared to their counterparts. Boosting higher education success for Māori and Pacific students has the potential to reduce ethnic inequalities in New Zealand labour market outcomes and may result in significant private benefits for these graduates and social benefits as a result of their contribution to society.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofHigher Education Research and Developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectEquityen_NZ
dc.subjectGraduate outcomesen_NZ
dc.subjecthigher educationen_NZ
dc.subjectindigenousen_NZ
dc.subjectlongitudinalen_NZ
dc.subjectMāorien_NZ
dc.subjectPacific Islanden_NZ
dc.subjectuniversityen_NZ
dc.titleEquity in New Zealand university graduate outcomes: Māori and Pacific graduatesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-07-07T03:27:22Z
otago.schoolPsychologyen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07294360.2017.1344198en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Higher Education Research & Development on 03/07/2017, available online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2017.1344198en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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