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dc.contributor.advisorPankhurst, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorMcLennan, Ian
dc.contributor.authorSirisomboonwong, Korawan Erika
dc.date.available2017-08-07T04:29:36Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationSirisomboonwong, K. E. (2017). The role of anti-Müllerian hormone in the brain’s response to steroid hormones (Thesis, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences with Honours). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7498en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7498
dc.description.abstractMany sexual dimorphisms that exist in the brain develop in the postnatal period. For males, this is when testosterone levels are minimal and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is elevated. Testosterone requires the enzyme aromatase to undergo conversion to oestradiol to exert masculinising effects on the brain. Hence, the effect of AMH on aromatase was investigated. Transgenic mice for the Type 2 AMH receptor (AMHR2) were used, with male AMHR2-/- mice compared to male and female AMHR2+/+ mice. Experimental groups included perinatal, pre-pubescent and adult mice to assess different hormonal environments. In situ hybridisation was utilised to assess the presence of aromatase. Radioactive in situ hybridisation showed that at 2 days old, there was a wide variation of aromatase expression within each genotype group. There were also similar levels of aromatase between the male AMHR2+/+ and AMHR2-/- mice. This indicates that the role of AMH is independent from aromatase. To confirm this, larger sample sizes would be used so statistical analysis could be performed. Location of AMH intracellular signalling molecules could be identified and genomic RNA studies could be used to assess the effect AMH has on neurons.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectAnti Müllerian Hormone
dc.subjectAMH
dc.subjectaromatase
dc.subjectIn situ hybridisation
dc.titleThe role of anti-Müllerian hormone in the brain’s response to steroid hormones
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-08-07T04:02:39Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Anatomy
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Biomedical Sciences with Honours
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelHonours
otago.openaccessOpen
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