Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRoxborogh, William John
dc.contributor.authorLatu, Latuivai Kioa
dc.date.available2017-10-16T22:38:39Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationLatu, L. K. (2017). Fetausia’i - a servant leadership paradigm for the mission of the Methodist Church in Samoa (Thesis, Master of Theology). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7600en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7600
dc.description.abstractChristian churches in Samoa today face public criticism regarding the autocratic style of leadership they have embraced and encouraged, which goes hand in hand with their lack of attention for people below the poverty line. This research addresses the problem entrenched in the theology and ecclesiology of the Methodist Church in Samoa (MCS) today, which is captured in the Samoan expression E lē fa’a’ele’elea se faife’au – literally translated, “pastors are not supposed to do dirty work.” The focus of the research is an analysis of the problem imbedded in this belief, particularly its failure to embody the Christ-like qualities of shepherding, stewardship, serving and caring. From a sociological point of view, the cultural values of tautua (service) and fa’aaloalo (respect) have been applied to the clergy through this expression in an exclusive and elitist way that promotes the status and wealth of church leaders or ministers, at the expense of the quality of life of their followers. The MCS’ style of leadership is hierarchical, and is manifested in the cultural system of va-fealoa’i or respect for those in authority, a system that privileges seniority and depends on the flow of material wealth from church members to clergy. This leadership model is viewed as absolute by many MCS ministers, but it also contributes to the contemporary economic and mission crises the Church now faces. It negates mutual service and embraces a notion of leadership centred in ‘being served.’ The Christological view of Jesus in the Gospels and the Pauline theology of servant leadership offers a different perspective, grounded in Jesus as ‘Servant-Lord.’ A new model of church leadership is proposed for the MCS, based on this Christocentric vision of servant leadership and the relational, inclusive and reciprocal understanding of service rooted in the Samoan cultural practice of fetausia’i (reciprocal caring).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectE le fa'a'ele'elea se faife'au
dc.subjectfa'aaloalo
dc.subjectfetausia'i
dc.subjectservant leadership
dc.subjecttautua
dc.titleFetausia'i - a servant leadership paradigm for the mission of the Methodist Church in Samoa
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-10-16T22:20:38Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineTheology and Religion
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Theology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record