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dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Ewan
dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Dusty
dc.contributor.authorTumilty, Steve
dc.contributor.authorChapple, Cathy M
dc.date.available2017-10-29T22:14:23Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationKennedy, E., Quinn, D., Tumilty, S., & Chapple, C. M. (2017). Clinical characteristics and outcomes of treatment of the cervical spine in patients with persistent post-concussion symptoms: A retrospective analysis. Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 29, 91-98. doi:10.1016/j.msksp.2017.03.002en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2468-7812
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7652
dc.descriptionPre-printen_NZ
dc.description.abstractBackground Concussion is typically defined as a mild brain injury, and yet the brain is unlikely to be the only source of persistent post-concussion symptoms. Concurrent injury to the cervical spine in particular is acknowledged as a potential source of common persistent symptoms such as headache, dizziness and neck pain. Objectives To describe the cervical spine findings in a series of patients with persistent post-concussion symptoms, and describe the clinical characteristics of a cervicogenic component when it is present. Design Retrospective chart review of a consecutive series of patients with concussion referred to a physiotherapist for cervical spine assessment. Method Patient charts for all patients over a calendar year referred by a concussion service provider to a physiotherapist for cervical spine assessment were de-identified and transferred to the research team. Clinical data were independently extracted by two research assistants and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results/findings Data were analysed from 46 patient charts. Those with a cervicogenic component (n=32) were distinguished from those without a cervicogenic component (n=14) by physical examination findings, particularly pain on manual segmental examination. Physiotherapy treatment of the cervicogenic component (n=21) achieved improvements in function (mean increase of 3.8 in the patient-specific functional scale), and pain (mean decrease of 4.6 in the numeric pain-rating scale). Conclusions The clinical characteristics described in this study give preliminary support to the idea that the cervical spine may contribute to persistent post-concussion symptoms, and highlight the value of physiotherapy assessment and treatment of the cervical spine following a concussive injury.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofMusculoskeletal Science and Practiceen_NZ
dc.subjectBrain concussionen_NZ
dc.subjectNecken_NZ
dc.subjectCervicogenicen_NZ
dc.subjectPhysiotherapyen_NZ
dc.subjectcervical spineen_NZ
dc.titleClinical characteristics of the cervical spine in patients with persistent post-concussion symptoms: a retrospective analysisen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-10-29T21:39:32Z
otago.schoolSchool of Physiotherapyen_NZ
otago.relation.issueJuneen_NZ
otago.relation.volume29en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.msksp.2017.03.002en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage98en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage91en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msksp.2017.03.002en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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