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dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Ewan
dc.contributor.authorAlbert, Michael
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Helen
dc.date.available2017-10-31T20:04:46Z
dc.date.copyright2017-12
dc.identifier.citationKennedy, E., Albert, M., & Nicholson, H. (2017). Do longus capitis and colli really stabilise the cervical spine? A study of their fascicular anatomy and peak force capabilities. Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 32, 104-113. doi:10.1016/j.msksp.2017.10.005en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2468-7812
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7664
dc.descriptionPre-printen_NZ
dc.description.abstractBackground Longus capitis and colli are proposed to play a role in stabilising the cervical spine, targeted in clinical and research practice with cranio-cervical flexion. However, it is not clear if these muscles are anatomically or biomechanically suited to a stabilising role. Objectives To describe the fascicular morphology of the longus capitis and colli, and estimate their peak force generating capabilities across the individual cervical motion segments. Study Design Biomechanical force modelling based on anatomical data Methods Three-part design including cadaveric dissection (n=7), in vivo MRI muscle volume calculation from serial slices in young healthy volunteers (n=6), and biomechanical modelling of the peak force generating capacities based on computed tomography scans of the head and neck. Results Longus capitis and colli are small muscles spanning multiple cervical motion segments. Bilateral peak flexion torque estimates were higher in the upper cervical spine (0.5 Nm), and unlikely to affect motion below the level of C5 (<0.2 Nm). Peak shear estimates were negligible (<20 N), while peak compression estimates were small (<80 N). Conclusions These data highlight the complex anatomy and small force capacity of longus capitis and colli, and have implications for their function. In particular, the small peak compression forces indicate that these muscles have a limited capacity to contribute to cervical stability via traditional mechanisms. This implies that the mechanism(s) by which cranio-cervical flexion exercises produce clinical benefits is worth exploring further.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevier Ltden_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofMusculoskeletal Science and Practiceen_NZ
dc.subjectLongus capitisen_NZ
dc.subjectLongus collien_NZ
dc.subjectDeep cervical flexorsen_NZ
dc.subjectDeep neck flexorsen_NZ
dc.subjectPhysiotherapyen_NZ
dc.subjectClinical anatomyen_NZ
dc.subjectAnatomyen_NZ
dc.subjectBiomechanicsen_NZ
dc.subjectNeck musclesen_NZ
dc.subjectNeck painen_NZ
dc.titleDo longus capitis and colli really stabilise the cervical spine? A study of their fascicular anatomy and peak force capabilitiesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-10-30T03:25:49Z
otago.schoolSchool of Physiotherapyen_NZ
otago.relation.issueDecemberen_NZ
otago.relation.volume32en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.msksp.2017.10.005en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage113en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage104en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.rights.statementThe final publication is available via Elsevier at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msksp.2017.10.005en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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