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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Stephen Elliot
dc.contributor.advisorWheen, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorKrott, David
dc.date.available2017-11-02T21:11:29Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationKrott, D. (2017). Guilty or not Guilty - The Call for International Environmental Criminal Law (Thesis, Master of Laws). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7679en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7679
dc.description.abstractThis thesis introduces the reader to the highly complex field of international environmental harms. This area of international law takes up a significant portion of the overall natural degradation of the planet, but still remains on the outer slopes of attention and concern within the international community of states. Given the significance of a healthy environment in general it is of utmost importance that international environmental crimes receive more attention to put an end to the thriving environmental destruction. The first chapter introduces into the complex topic and reveals the threat potential of international environmental harms. The second part approaches the current situation of legal handling regarding international environmental harms. The third chapter then raises the question, whether and how criminalisation can be a calming factor for this problem. The following parts explore possible international fora to handle international environmental crimes more properly in the future. The options to rely on the existing International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court or to create a potential International Court for the Environment and a World Environmental Organisation will be examined carefully. This work outlines that international environmental crimes should not be taken lightly, as they largely affect the global community as a whole. For an effective way to combat international environmental crimes a centralised comprehensive approach on the international level is needed. Within the range of intergovernmental organisations and international courts a fictional new World Environmental Organisation and the existing International Criminal Court shine out. Therefore the foundation of a World Environmental Organisation as well as an “environmental reformation”, to explicitly open up the court’s jurisdiction for international environmental crimes, of the International Criminal Court are being promoted as vital to get international environmental crimes under control.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectInternational environmental law
dc.subjectinternational environmental criminal law
dc.subjectInternational environmental harm
dc.subjectinternational environmental crime
dc.subjectwildlife crime
dc.subjectillegal fishing
dc.subjectwhaling
dc.subjectguilt
dc.subjectICJ
dc.subjectICC
dc.subjectInternational Court of Justice
dc.subjectInternational Criminal Court
dc.subjectWEO
dc.subjectWorld Environment Organisation
dc.subjecttransboundary pollution
dc.subjectIllegal trade in ozone-depleting substances
dc.subjectMEA
dc.subjectCITES
dc.subjectBasel Convention
dc.subjectMontreal Protocol
dc.subjectCriminalisation
dc.subjectEcocide
dc.subjectGeocide
dc.subjectICE
dc.subjectInternational Court for the Environment
dc.titleGuilty or not Guilty - The Call for International Environmental Criminal Law
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-11-02T20:46:17Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineFaculty of Law
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Laws
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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