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dc.contributor.advisorGilmore, Alison
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Lisa
dc.contributor.advisorGunn, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorSmaill, Esther Mary
dc.date.available2018-02-14T23:57:41Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationSmaill, E. M. (2018). Social moderation: Assessment for teacher professional learning (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7850en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7850
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses New Zealand’s unmet need for additional teacher professional learning opportunities in assessment. It reports on a yearlong, multi-case study involving the teachers at three New Zealand primary schools. This study investigated whether teachers, working within the National Standards context, could use their participation in social moderation to help the sector meet the need for professional learning in assessment. It asked: how and what do teachers learn about assessment through their involvement in social moderation? Drawing upon both social constructionism (Crotty, 1998) and Wenger’s (1998) social theory of learning, the study used observations, interviews, and a questionnaire to produce data about teachers’ experiences of social moderation. The analyses of these data, which utilised key elements of grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006), yielded important insights into how involvement in social moderation can strengthen teachers’ assessment capability. The study identified that teachers were able to use their participation in social moderation to improve their understandings of assessment for learning principles and practices. It also demonstrated that taking part in social moderation enabled the participating teachers to learn about factors that can affect the dependability of student assessment information. Moreover, it showed that teachers believed that involvement in social moderation had contributed positively to their assessment capability. This study also found that the teachers at the three participating schools garnered qualitatively different learning opportunities from their experiences of social moderation. These differences were linked to a series of school-specific conditions. These conditions included the amount of time that schools committed to moderation, the types of moderation activity that teachers engaged in, and the nature of the rationale that teachers developed to sustain their involvement in moderation. These school-specific factors shaped the extent to which participation in social moderation enabled teachers to take part in the formation of a school-wide, assessment-focused community of practice. The findings from this study indicate that using involvement in social moderation to develop such a community of practice increases the likelihood that all teachers are afforded opportunities to learn about assessment. The recommendations that arise from this study are intended to help schools strengthen their social moderation processes in ways that should enable teachers to harness additional, assessment-focused professional learning opportunities.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectsocial moderationen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher professional learningen_NZ
dc.subjectassessment capabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectassessment for learningen_NZ
dc.subjectformative assessmenten_NZ
dc.subjectdependabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectprofessional judgementen_NZ
dc.subjectcriteria developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectcommunities of practiceen_NZ
dc.subjectNational Standardsen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand educationen_NZ
dc.titleSocial moderation: Assessment for teacher professional learningen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-02-14T21:21:16Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of Educationen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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