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dc.contributor.advisorRuffman, Ted
dc.contributor.authorIversen, Genevieve Rose
dc.date.available2018-02-20T22:36:02Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationIversen, G. R. (2018). A Fairy Tale or a True Story? Lie Detection and Leakage (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7859en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7859
dc.description.abstractLiars may try to act like they are telling the truth, yet these attempts may fail. Ekman (1992) has argued that liars may leak clues to their true feelings in fleeting expressions. This thesis tested this idea. Facial expression differences between university students’ lies and truths were examined with facial recognition software and behaviour rating scales. Study 1 examined if participants’ (N=102) facial expressions varied as a function of the content that they had viewed, when they honestly or deceptively described a film. When brief episodes of increased muscle tension were isolated in the computer analysis a clear trend emerged for there to be more muscle movement in lies than truths across the face (i.e. brow, eyes, nose and chin). However, the film content (which was designed to elicit feelings of amusement, disgust or no emotional response) did not contribute to this difference. The trend identified in Study 1, was replicated in Study 2, in which participants (n=41) were asked to discuss their opinions truthfully and deceptively. However, the findings did not generalise to a condition where participants (n=40) provided arguments that were consistent or inconsistent with their opinion, when lying was not required. Thus, factors specific to situations in which lying is required (e.g. attempts to manage deception cues) may account for the difference. Study 3 examined if students with better emotion recognition skills (n=68) may be better at detecting lies because they notice emotional expressions that others may miss. Participants (N=138) rated the behaviour of speakers from Study 1, and judged whether they were lying. The results suggest that lie judgements may be related to the participants’ expectations, and that those with better emotion recognition skills may not have special skills at distinguishing genuine and deceptive expressions. In Study 4, ratings were obtained for messages collected in Study 2 (N=100). Arguments (i.e. opinion-consistent/inconsistent) varied for emotional expression, but lies and truths did not. Thus, it appears impression management processes may contribute to the difference in facial lability identified in Study 1 and 2.
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectLying
dc.subjectlie
dc.subjectdeception
dc.subjectdetection
dc.subjectaccuracy
dc.subjectcues
dc.subjectauditory
dc.subjectcontext
dc.subjectarousal
dc.subjectattempted
dc.subjectcontrol
dc.subjectcognitive
dc.subjecteffort
dc.subjectfacial
dc.subjectexpressions
dc.subjectEkman
dc.subjectleakage
dc.subjectmicro-expression
dc.subjectstudent
dc.subjectvideo
dc.subjectopinion
dc.subjectstatements
dc.subjectsound
dc.subjectvisual
dc.subjectaffect
dc.subjectamusement
dc.subjectpositive
dc.subjectdisgust
dc.subjectnegative
dc.subjectneutral
dc.subjectCERT
dc.subjectsoftware
dc.subjectcomputer
dc.subjectexpression
dc.subjectrecognition
dc.subjecttoolkit
dc.subjectmuscle
dc.subjectactivation
dc.subjectlability
dc.subjectmovement
dc.subjectface
dc.subjectaction
dc.subjectunit
dc.subjectAU1
dc.subjectAU2
dc.subjectAU5
dc.subjectAU6
dc.subjectAU9
dc.subjectAU17
dc.subjectinner
dc.subjectouter
dc.subjectfear
dc.subjectdistress
dc.subjectbrow
dc.subjectnose
dc.subjectwrinkle
dc.subjecteye
dc.subjectwiden
dc.subjectcheek
dc.subjectchin
dc.subjectraise
dc.titleA Fairy Tale or a True Story? Lie Detection and Leakage
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-02-20T20:59:44Z
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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