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dc.contributor.authorKypri, Kyprosen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLangley, Johnen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWhigham, Peter Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorWiggers, Johnen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:03:07Z
dc.date.copyright2005-11en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationKypri, K., Langley, J., Whigham, P. A., & Wiggers, J. (2005, November). Geospatial aspects of alcohol-related harm in New Zealand. Presented at the 17th Annual Colloquium of the Spatial Information Research Centre (SIRC 2005: A Spatio-temporal Workshop).en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/798
dc.descriptionOnly the abstract was published in the proceedings. There is no full text.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractThe leading cause of mortality in 15-24 year-olds in New Zealand is injury, accounting for three quarters of deaths. Road traffic crashes account for over half of all injury deaths and a third of hospitalisations, and hazardous alcohol consumption is the primary contributor to these events. The public health goal of this project is the prevention of alcohol-related injury. In the past 15 years, NZ has liberalised access to alcohol via changes to the Sale of Liquor Act (1989), changes in land use laws (1991), and the reduction in the minimum purchase age (1999). In the same period, government controls on advertising and promotion of alcohol have been relaxed. By way of illustration, in 1989 NZ had 6000 liquor outlets while in 2004 the figure was 14800. In comparison, with five times NZ’s population, Australia has 12000 outlets. There is compelling evidence that environmental variables (physical, social, and legislative) are powerful determinants of drinking behaviour. Drinking occurs within the context of local authority policies, business practices, and law enforcement. Many of these have a spatial dimension (e.g. liquor outlet density) and casual observation suggests that there is considerable variation in the levels of these variables across NZ. For example: 1. Demography: the age, gender, and ethnic mix of communities. 2. Geography: factors such as proximity to licensed premises, density of liquor outlets, transport patterns, housing density; 3. Commercial activity: the intensity of competition among liquor outlets reflected in advertising and promotion of alcohol; 4. Local politics: the local authority stance on alcohol, reflected in policy statements and bylaws (e.g., liquor bans); 5. Institutional factors: institutional policies, availability and promotion of alcohol on tertiary education campuses, traditions, civic events relevant to alcohol, availability and quality of support services; 6. Law enforcement: the extent to which the intoxication provisions of the Sale of Liquor Act are enforced by police and licensing authorities in the community. 7. Healthcare: the availability and quality of screening, brief intervention, and treatment Services. The aims of this project are (1) to develop measures for formally characterising these potential influences; and (2) to examine the relations between policy-relevant (i.e. modifiable) spatial elements and drinking behaviour. As a starting point IPRU, in collaboration with SIRC, are seeking to determine the most appropriate way to determine the nature of relationships which exist between distribution of alcohol outlets and alcohol-related harm.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/SIRC05/conferences/2005/20_kypri.pdfen_NZ
dc.subjectpublic healthen_NZ
dc.subjectGISen_NZ
dc.subjectalcohol-related harmen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleGeospatial aspects of alcohol-related harm in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeConference or Workshop Item (Oral presentation)en_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-08-15en_NZ
otago.relation.pages149en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints360en_NZ
dc.description.refereedNon Peer Revieweden_NZ
otago.school.eprintsSpatial Information Research Centreen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInjury Prevention Research Uniten_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsPreventive & Social Medicineen_NZ
otago.event.dates24-25 November 2005en_NZ
otago.event.placeDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
otago.event.typeconferenceen_NZ
otago.event.title17th Annual Colloquium of the Spatial Information Research Centre (SIRC 2005: A Spatio-temporal Workshop)en_NZ
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