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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.advisorGasson, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Jacqueline Mary
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:53:56Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationMurray, J. M. (2018). An exploratory study into the consistency and effectiveness of written feedback provided by markers in a tertiary education programme (Thesis, Doctor of Education). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8043en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8043
dc.description.abstractAlthough consistency and effectiveness of feedback have been alluded to in literature, there has been little research that has specifically looked at these issues. Very few studies have quantified feedback types or looked at whether markers consistently use the same feedback types on written assignments. Most studies have instead asked students, through interviews, about the nature of feedback they have received. These studies found that feedback received is inconsistent in its quantity and quality, and that it is often ineffective. In conducting a literature search for this research, very few studies were found that examined consistency of feedback types used by markers when marking the same assignment or that used descriptive statistics to show variability in feedback types used by these markers. This research aimed to address this gap. Markers in two different studies marked and provided feedback on the same student assignments, and a taxonomy for coding different feedback types used by markers was developed. This taxonomy was based upon already defined feedback types, a review of currently available coding systems for feedback, and a deductive and inductive analysis of feedback types currently used by markers in the study. The findings of the research revealed that inconsistency was occurring among markers, both across and within assignments, and that very little effective feedback was being provided. The inconsistency was occurring in the score/grade given, in the amount and types of feedback used, and in the messages conveyed in the feedback comments. Feedback was classified as being effective if it provided information that answered Hattie and Timperley’s (2007) three questions; where am I going, how am I going and where to next? Very few comments in the research answered these three questions, thus, very little feedback provided by markers was found to be effective. This research had only a small number of participants and focused on one institution, so the findings cannot be generalised. Further studies in other institutions and/or in other areas of education would help to support or refute the findings found here. Lack of consistency is an issue that is occurring in education, and it is an issue that deserves more attention. Students deserve feedback that is consistent and effective, allowing them to improve future work. This research is intended to increase awareness around these two issues.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectWritten feedback
dc.subjectMarker feedback
dc.subjectEffective feedback comments
dc.subjectTaxonomy of feedback types
dc.subjectConsistency in feedback
dc.subjectFeedback coding
dc.subjectFeedback types
dc.titleAn exploratory study into the consistency and effectiveness of written feedback provided by markers in a tertiary education programme
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-05-15T23:01:19Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineCollege of education
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Education
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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