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dc.contributor.authorWehi, Priscilla M.
dc.contributor.authorCox, Murray P
dc.contributor.authorRoa, Tom
dc.contributor.authorWhaanga, Hemi
dc.date.available2018-07-06T04:35:56Z
dc.date.copyright2018-06-04
dc.identifier.citationWehi, P. M., Cox, M. P., Roa, T., & Whaanga, H. (2018). Human Perceptions of Megafaunal Extinction Events Revealed by Linguistic Analysis of Indigenous Oral Traditions. Human Ecology. doi:10.1007/s10745-018-0004-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8168
dc.description.abstractHuman settlement into new regions is typically accompanied by waves of animal extinctions, yet we have limited understanding of how human communities perceived and responded to such ecological crises. The first megafaunal extinctions in New Zealand began just 700 years ago, in contrast to the deep time of continental extinctions. Consequently, indigenous Māori oral tradition includes ancestral sayings that explicitly refer to extinct species. Our linguistic analysis of these sayings shows a strong bias towards critical food species such as moa, and emphasizes that Māori closely observed the fauna and environment. Temporal changes in form and content demonstrate thatMāori recognized the loss of important animal resources, and that this loss reverberated culturally centuries later. The data provide evidence that extinction of keystone fauna was important for shaping ecological and social thought inMāori society, and suggest a similar role in other early societies that lived through megafaunal extinction events.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringeren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Ecologyen_NZ
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectCultural evolution . Indigenous resource management . Megafauna . Moa . Oceania . New Zealand . Maori . Socio-ecological systems . Traditional ecological knowledge Introductionen_NZ
dc.titleHuman Perceptions of Megafaunal Extinction Events Revealed by Linguistic Analysis of Indigenous Oral Traditionsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-07-05T22:36:04Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10745-018-0004-0en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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CC0 1.0 Universal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as CC0 1.0 Universal