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dc.contributor.advisorThompson-Fawcett, Michelle
dc.contributor.advisorFitzsimons, Sean
dc.contributor.authorHermans, Oliver Francis
dc.date.available2018-07-08T21:16:39Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationHermans, O. F. (2018). Flood Management in New Zealand: Exploring Management and Practice in Otago and the Manawatu (Thesis, Master of Planning). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8172en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8172
dc.description.abstractThis research assesses how effective present flood management is in New Zealand, and what it may come to look like in the future. The importance of effective flood management is amplified by both human development in floodplains and the consequences of climate change on the hydrological system. Analysis of the practices in the Manawatu and Otago regions was undertaken to meet the aims of this research. Five objectives were developed to structure this research. These objectives were to: examine the literature surrounding this topic to establish a theoretical basis from which to build the study; investigate the extent of difference residents of rural and urban settings understand and react to flooding; evaluate current flood policy within the specified regions, and what factors influence current and future policy; evaluate the role of risk-based management in current policy and the influence it has on the shape of future policy; and examine the role of climate change in influencing current and future approaches to flooding in New Zealand. The literature review established a number of concerns and issues which affect modern flood management. The literature review made clear the need to approach flood management as part of a wider system of environmental management, while recognising that both the past and future have a significant influence on management practices. An analysis of current planning documents was conducted to assess current policy, using five components: mitigation; adaptation; avoidance; social capacity building; climate change. These components allowed for comparison of management practices between the two regions. Several key conclusions were found following this analysis, these include a recognition that flood management is most effective when regions can determine their approach, rather than allowing greater control from central government. Additionally, other environmental issues occurring in and around river and lake beds complicate the response to flooding. While current flood defence measures are acceptable in both regions, there is significant room for improvement in some of the assessed components. Finally, historical settlement of flood-prone areas and decisions made by past leadership continue to influence both the current situation and must be accounted for in future planning decisions.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectFlood
dc.subjectManagement
dc.subjectFlood Management
dc.subjectRural and Urban Flooding
dc.titleFlood Management in New Zealand: Exploring Management and Practice in Otago and the Manawatu
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-07-06T06:31:38Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Planning
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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