Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLegun, Katharine
dc.contributor.advisorEllis, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Kelly Elizabeth
dc.date.available2018-08-28T02:09:32Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationSimmons, K. E. (2018). Sustainable Development and Sustainable Wine New Zealand: Bridging Neoliberal Statecraft and Locally Appropriate Development (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8296en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8296
dc.description.abstractJames C. Scott argues that states require schematic knowledge of local realities. This standardized knowledge produces one-size-fits-all development solutions, which can fail to adequately account for context and thus result in environmental and social destruction. Sustainable development uses statecraft within the hegemony of neoliberalism, addressing environmental, social, and economic issues with market mechanisms. Neoliberal statecraft approaches face opposition politically—from the global justice movement that opposes unlimited economic growth—and methodologically—from Participatory Approach and Sustainable Rural Livelihood advocates who argue the need for locally situated development. Framing this conflict within weak and strong sustainability models, this research explores if top-down, neoliberal, one-size-fits-all development can work in locally appropriate ways. To this end, this research explores the interplay between regional council water management and Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand certification (SWNZ), a market-based regulatory mechanism. Interviews with twelve wine producers established that SWNZ is a one-size-fits-all scheme that is neoliberal at an institutional but not at a grassroots level. Furthermore, SWNZ fosters locally appropriate practices in three main ways: by requiring compliance with regional councils; by directing wine producers to consider their environmental needs through ‘good practice’ questions; and by offering New Zealand Sustainability Dashboard reports that provide wine producers with a contextualized best practice model. These insights provide a better understanding of sustainable wine growing in New Zealand and also how a weakly sustainable, neoliberal framework can produce strongly sustainable, non-neoliberal outcomes.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectNew Zealand Wine
dc.subjectWine
dc.subjectSustainable Wine New Zealand
dc.subjectSustainable Development
dc.subjectNeoliberalism
dc.subjectSeeing Like a State
dc.subjectWeak Sustainability
dc.subjectStrong Sustainability
dc.subjectRegional Councils
dc.subjectQuality Assurance Certifications
dc.subjectThird-party certification
dc.titleSustainable Development and Sustainable Wine New Zealand: Bridging Neoliberal Statecraft and Locally Appropriate Development
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-08-28T01:29:21Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineSociology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record