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dc.contributor.authorMann, Samuelen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBenwell, George Len_NZ
dc.contributor.authorLee, William Gen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:07Z
dc.date.copyright1997-03en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMann, S., Benwell, G. L., & Lee, W. G. (1997). Landscape structure and ecosystem conservation: an assessment using remote sensing (Information Science Discussion Papers Series No. 97/02). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/833en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/833
dc.description.abstractAnalyses of landscape structure are used to test the hypothesis that remotely sensed images can be used as indicators of ecosystem conservation status. Vegetation types based on a classified SPOT satellite image were used in a comparison of paired, reserve (conservation area) and adjacent more human modified areas (controls). Ten reserves (average size 965 ha) were selected from upland tussock grasslands in Otago, New Zealand. While there were equal numbers of vegetation types and the size and shape distribution of patches within the overall landscapes were not significantly different, there was less of ‘target’ vegetation in controls. This was in smaller patches and fewer of these patches contained ‘core areas’. These control ‘target’ patches were also less complex in shape than those in the adjacent reserves. These measures showed that remotely sensed images can be used to derive large scale indicators of landscape conservation status. An index is proposed for assessing landscape change and conservation management issues are raised.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInformation Science Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleLandscape structure and ecosystem conservation: an assessment using remote sensingen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages18en_NZ
otago.date.accession2011-01-18 20:26:32en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints1034en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsSpatial Information Research Centreen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
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otago.relation.number97/02en_NZ
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