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dc.contributor.advisorHodge, Ken
dc.contributor.advisorBoyes, Mike
dc.contributor.authorMiles, Adam James
dc.date.available2018-09-18T21:56:34Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationMiles, A. J. (2018). Developing, Delivering, and Assessing the ‘Performance and Personal Excellence Programme’: A Multiphase, Mixed-Methods Research Project (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8348en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8348
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research project was to develop, deliver, and assess the effectiveness of a life skills (LS) programme for promoting performance excellence and personal excellence in elite athletes. Multiple types of programme evaluation, underpinned by a multiphase, mixed-methods design that spanned three studies, were used to address the purpose of this research project. A needs-analysis evaluation was conducted to explore the specific needs of the target population in Study One. The participants for Study One were 12 experienced, male professional cricketers (Mage = 28.83yrs; SDage = 3.04yrs). A semi-structured interview technique was used to interview these cricketers regarding their perceptions of the LS development during their professional cricket careers. Narrative thematic analysis revealed four main themes associated with communication, self-regulation, motivation, and problem-solving; skills that could be integrated into a strength-based LS programme for professional cricketers. The findings from Study One informed the development of a LS programme for professional cricketers (The Performance and Personal Excellence Programme; PPEP). The purpose of Study Two was to examine the instrumental and conceptual processes associated with delivering the PPEP using a process-improvement evaluation. A process-improvement evaluation was conducted with three groups of cricketers during two pilots and the delivery of the PPEP. The first two evaluations were conducted during pilot deliveries of the PPEP with four professional cricketers (Mage = 22.62yrs; SDage = 2.09yrs) and 13 male amateur cricketers (Mage = 17.12yrs; SDage = 0.86yrs), and the third evaluation was conducted during the delivery of the PPEP to six male professional cricketers (Mage = 22.00yrs; SDage = 1.83yrs). Anderson’s (1999) reflective practice model was employed to better understand critical events that occurred during the delivery of the PPEP in Pilot One, Pilot Two, and Programme Delivery. Content analysis of the reflection data revealed three main themes (internal assets, context, and external assets). These findings can be used to understand the ongoing development of the PPEP and to guide neophyte practitioners during programme design, delivery, and development. The purpose of Study Three was to assess the processes and outcomes of the PPEP using multiple types of programme evaluation. The PPEP was delivered to six male professional cricketers (Mage = 22.00yrs; SDage = 1.83yrs). These cricketers participated in six group workshops and completed nine online take-home tasks over a 12-week period. An outcome-assessment evaluation, using series of A1BA2 single-case designs and follow-up interviews, was conducted to evaluate the PPEP effects on LS acquisition, athletic identity commitment, and psychological need satisfaction. Effect sizes indicated moderate support for LS acquisition during the PPEP, whilst athletic identity commitment increased, and psychological need satisfaction decreased. Narrative thematic analysis of the qualitative data highlighted multiple experiences that occurred during the intervention and post-intervention phases that likely influenced the participants’ ability to display both performance and personal excellence. An outcome-improvement evaluation was conducted using extended social validation procedures (i.e., one questionnaire and two interviews). Content analysis of the data revealed that the PPEP was an enjoyable and valuable experience, with the taught LS being utilised in both sport and non-sport contexts. The main knowledge contributions from this research project include: (i) the value of understanding the unique needs of the athletic population under investigation, adopting a systematic process to assist with the development of the PPEP, and the use of multiple evaluation procedures to assess various processes and outcomes of LS programmes; (ii) The content and structure of the PPEP was effective for developing LS in a group of professional cricketers and the skills taught were perceived as beneficial for promoting competence in current and future life domains; (iii) to better support athletes’ throughout and beyond their athletic careers, future researchers might extend upon the findings from this research project by examining the mediating processes that influence LS acquisition, identity development, and need-satisfaction.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectlife skills development
dc.subjectathlete career development
dc.subjectathlete career transitions
dc.subjectlife development intervention
dc.subjectpsychosocial development
dc.subjectpsychological skills
dc.subjectelite athletes
dc.subjectathletic identity
dc.subjectbasic needs theory
dc.subjectpsychological wellbeing
dc.titleDeveloping, Delivering, and Assessing the ‘Performance and Personal Excellence Programme’: A Multiphase, Mixed-Methods Research Project
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-09-18T04:40:28Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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