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dc.contributor.advisorFeryok, Anne
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Elisha Hannah
dc.date.available2018-10-16T20:14:59Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationGordon, E. H. (2018). University Study Abroad in New Zealand: Identity, Ideology, and Investment in English Language Learning (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8438en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8438
dc.description.abstractStudy abroad experiences are often seen as being good for, or even necessary for, attaining a high level of second language (L2) proficiency. However, not all students achieve the same level of L2 proficiency from their study abroad, in part due to their second language investment. Using Darvin and Norton’s (2015) theory of investment, and expanding on this theory with Bucholtz and Hall’s (2005) identity principles, investment is comprised of the complex interaction between the learners’ identities, capital, and the ideologies of both the learner and their language learning context. The present study investigated how study abroad students invested in the target language (TL) and in TL-mediated practices while on a semester-long study abroad at the University of Otago, New Zealand. Over the course of one university semester five study abroad students engaged in a journaling and interview process, which also included the creation of photo narratives and social maps. Using a case study approach, this study found that participants had many investments in the different fields of the study abroad context, each for a different desired outcome. Some investments that participants made were to acquire, or participate in, the target language; however other investments were made to attain specific material or symbolic capital, or to have a desired L2-mediated identity emerge. Further, participants gained other desirable material and symbolic capital through emergent L1-mediated identities. Alongside participants’ successful investments, this study examines when participants were unable to invest, and when their investment did not attain them the capital they had expected. The study concludes by using these findings to provide recommendations for future study abroad students, study abroad advisors, and implications for further research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectIdentity
dc.subjectSecond Language Identity
dc.subjectidentities
dc.subjectinvestment
dc.subjectcapital
dc.subjectsocial capital
dc.subjectcultural capital
dc.subjecteconomic capital
dc.subjectstudy abroad
dc.subjectexchange
dc.subjectUniversity
dc.subjectmultiple identities
dc.subjectemergence
dc.subjectindexicality
dc.subjectpositionality
dc.subjectpartialness
dc.subjectrelationality
dc.subjectlanguage learning
dc.subjectlanguage
dc.subjectsocial maps
dc.subjectsocial map
dc.subjectphoto narrative
dc.subjectphoto narratives
dc.subjectcase study
dc.subjectinterview
dc.subjectjournal
dc.subjectinterviews
dc.subjectjournals
dc.subjectcase studies
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.titleUniversity Study Abroad in New Zealand: Identity, Ideology, and Investment in English Language Learning
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-10-16T05:03:44Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish and Linguistics
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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