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dc.contributor.advisorO'Hare, David
dc.contributor.authorKinney, Lana
dc.date.available2018-10-17T01:18:17Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationKinney, L. (2018). Physiological Arousal, Information Processing, Performance and Expertise in Expected and Unexpected Abnormal Flight Events: An Empirical Investigation. (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8447en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8447
dc.description.abstractAviation accident reports indicate that preventable incidents are developing into tragedies with pilots responding incorrectly to well-trained events e.g. engine failures. Recent research suggests that startle (an autonomic response to an acute stimulus with a sudden onset), following unexpected abnormal flight events is impacting pilot performance, leading to accidents. The present study was designed to investigate whether a simulated unexpected abnormal flight event can lead to startle. Information processing and performance differences between expected and unexpected flight events were also measured. Furthermore, the influence of expertise on arousal, information processing and performance in these events was investigated. Two studies were conducted. The first study employed university students recruited through the University of Otago Psychology Database. The second study employed general aviation pilots recruited through social media advertising. Students and pilots flew a series of flights in a fixed-base flight simulator including four experimental flights which included an unexpected or an expected, engine failure or aerodynamic stall. During the flights, heart rate, eye-tracking, and flight data were recorded. Increased heart rate and larger pupil dilation during the unexpected engine failure indicated the presence of startle in pilots. During the unexpected engine failure pilots showed a disrupted information processing strategy that indicated attentional tunnelling. Whereas, during the unexpected stall the information processing patterns indicated lack of recognition. During the unexpected events performance was impaired when compared to the expected events. However, poor performance was not associated with higher levels of arousal. In a third comparative study, data from novice (university students), intermediate (student and private licenced) and expert (commercial licenced) pilots were compared to investigate the effects of expertise. Information processing, arousal, and performance did not differ significantly over the three levels of expertise. This research supports a recently formulated theory on startle and surprise and has implications for successful training.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectStartle
dc.subjectAviation
dc.subjectUnexpected Events
dc.subjectEmergency
dc.subjectPilot
dc.subjectBehaviour
dc.subjectSurprise
dc.subjectEngine Failure
dc.subjectStall
dc.subjectPilot Performance
dc.subjectHeart Rate
dc.subjectSimulation
dc.subjectEye Tracking
dc.subjectInformation Processing
dc.titlePhysiological Arousal, Information Processing, Performance and Expertise in Expected and Unexpected Abnormal Flight Events: An Empirical Investigation.
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-10-17T00:30:18Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
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