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dc.contributor.authorConnell, Simon
dc.date.available2018-11-29T20:28:36Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citation(2016) 47 VUWLR 245-265.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8640
dc.description.abstractNon est factum (Latin for "not my deed") is a common law doctrine that can allow the signer of a legal document to escape the usual legal consequences of their signature. In its early days, non est factum was available only to blind and illiterate persons who, without being careless, relied on another party's seriously flawed explanation of the document. Non est factum can void contracts, but I argue the general explanation for the doctrine is not a satisfactory explanation for why it applies to contracts. This article considers whether there is an explanation for non est factum that is consistent with contract law thinking. I argue that there is, and explain non est factum as an application of the objective principle set out in Smith v Hughes.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherVictoria University of Wellington Law Schoolen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofVictoria University of Wellington Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectNon est factumen_NZ
dc.subjectSmith v Hughesen_NZ
dc.subjectContract lawen_NZ
dc.subjectCommon lawen_NZ
dc.titleNot My Doctrine? Finding a Contract Law Explanation for Non Est Factumen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-11-28T21:29:08Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.relation.volume47en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage265en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage245en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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