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dc.contributor.authorFielding, Daviden_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:17Z
dc.date.copyright2010-08-01en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationFielding, D. (2010). Inertia and Herding in Humanitarian Aid Decisions (Economics Discussion Papers Series No. 1009). Department of Economics, University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/864en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/864
dc.description.abstractUsing panel data for the period 1995-2008, we model the aid allocation decisions of the three largest official donors of humanitarian aid: the United States government, the United Kingdom government and the European Commission. We find evidence that donor decisions depend on both the recipient’s need and the donor’s economic interest, but with marked asymmetries in the relative importance of different factors across the three donors. Moreover, some donors exhibit much more inertia than others in responding to new areas of need, and some are much more influenced by the decisions of other donors. Despite being a relatively small donor, the United Kingdom is particularly influential.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherDepartment of Economics, University of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomics Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/index.htmlen_NZ
dc.subjectHumanitarian aid; Dynamic panel modelen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHB Economic Theoryen_NZ
dc.titleInertia and Herding in Humanitarian Aid Decisionsen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages32en_NZ
otago.date.accession2010-10-05 20:49:39en_NZ
otago.schoolDepartment of Economicsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints935en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
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otago.relation.number1009en_NZ
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