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dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Jessica
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:12:34Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationPalmer J, "Implications of the New Rule Against Penalties" (2016) 47 Victoria University of Wellington Law Review 287-308.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8684
dc.description.abstractWhether a contractual term is penal and therefore unenforceable has usually been determined by distinguishing it from stipulations that are a reasonable contemplation of loss resulting from breach. This article considers recent decisions of the High Court of Australia and the United Kingdom Supreme Court that have made significant revisions of the rule. Both Courts have diverged from the traditional formulation and, to some extent, from each other. I argue that the traditional rule against penalties reflects foundational principles of contract law and not merely notions of fairness or justice in the round. The recent revisions to the rule have implications for the role and boundaries of contract law more generally and reflect increasing attention being paid to the "performance interest".en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherVictoria University of Wellington Law Schoolen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofVictoria University of Wellington Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectPenaltiesen_NZ
dc.subjectPerformance interesten_NZ
dc.subjectContract lawen_NZ
dc.titleImplications of the New Rule Against Penaltiesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-11-28T23:26:13Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.relation.volume47en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage308en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage287en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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