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dc.contributor.advisorKawharu, Merata
dc.contributor.advisorTapsell, Paul
dc.contributor.advisorRewi, Poia
dc.contributor.authorTane, Paratene
dc.date.available2018-12-18T04:08:18Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.citationTane, P. (2018). Whakapapakāinga: a template for the cross- generational development of marae-communities (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/8758en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8758
dc.description.abstractThrough case study research located in Northland, New Zealand, this thesis investigates the future of papakāinga (kin-community settlements) and their marae (ancestral centres of tribal identity). Māori kin-communities have transformed in response to crisis and opportunity over generations. Due to historical impacts of Māori land alienation, individualisation, and Māori urbanisation, the binding fabric of papakāinga – kinship and economy – has weakened. ‘Whakapapakāinga: a template for the cross-generational development of marae- communities’ investigates the concerns and hopes of the descendants of Oromahoe regarding the future of their papakāinga. It uses interviews with elders, a Māori land trust; a questionnaire with community descendants (local and non-local), archival research, and reflexive ethnography. The key finding of this research investigation is that papakāinga development should innovate within central needs – energy, housing and food – that restore economy around papakāinga and reactivate functional kinship links between community members. This thesis is a study in the field of the target audience. The findings are to assist the Oromahoe Trust, the Oromahoe marae and its descendants (local and non-local) in shaping a strategic direction for their ancestral settlement, their papakāinga. The findings also provide an kin-insider approach to papakāinga development for housing development agencies, district and regional councils, funding agencies, banks, architecture firms, solar technology suppliers and Māori and non-Māori agricultural and horticultural enterprises that neighbour papakāinga. It is important not only to New Zealand’s 778 papakāinga, but also small indigenous communities elsewhere in the world facing similar crises of relevance to descendant diasporas, identity and development.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectPapakāinga, whakapapa,
dc.titleWhakapapakāinga: a template for the cross- generational development of marae-communities
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2018-12-18T03:18:26Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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