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dc.contributor.authorEtang, Alvinen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Daviden_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, Stephenen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:23Z
dc.date.copyright2010-08-01en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationEtang, A., Fielding, D., & Knowles, S. (2010). Giving to Africa and Perceptions of Poverty (Economics Discussion Papers Series No. 1008). Department of Economics, University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/881en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/881
dc.description.abstractWe conduct a simple experiment in which student participants are invited to give some of the money that they have earned to an international development charity. In different treatments, participants are given different information about the country in which the donation will be spent. The information on the country includes the country’s income per capita and, in some treatments, different possible reasons as to why the country is poor. We find that experimental behaviour depends largely on the characteristics of the participant rather than on the treatment. The most important characteristics are the participant’s intended major subject, level of happiness and the frequency of religious activity.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherDepartment of Economics, University of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomics Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/index.htmlen_NZ
dc.subjectGenerosityen_NZ
dc.subjectCharitable Donationsen_NZ
dc.subjectAltruismen_NZ
dc.subjectDictator Gameen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHB Economic Theoryen_NZ
dc.titleGiving to Africa and Perceptions of Povertyen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages28en_NZ
otago.date.accession2010-10-05 20:39:19en_NZ
otago.schoolDepartment of Economicsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints934en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
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otago.relation.number1008en_NZ
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