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dc.contributor.authorWolfe, Henry Ben_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:24Z
dc.date.copyright1997-07en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWolfe, H. B. (1997). Privacy enhancing technology (Information Science Discussion Papers Series No. 97/09). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/884en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/884
dc.descriptionPlease note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractPrivacy is one of the most fundamental of human rights. It is not a privilege granted by some authority or state. It is, in fact, necessary for each human being’s normal development and survival. Those nations who have, in the past, and currently follow the notion that they have the authority and/or moral high ground to grant or deny privacy to their citizens are notable for their other human rights violations. This paper is centered around the above premise and will offer the reader some good news and some bad news. But most important, it will put the reader on notice that our privacy is constantly under attack from one vested interest or another and that each and every one of us must be vigilant in the protection of our private matters. It is common in New Zealand to assume that anything secret is bad. This is an extremely naïve position to take for any intelligent individual. The old phrase “if you haven’t got anything to hide, then you shouldn’t mind…” is often used to intimidate, manipulate or coerce an individual to “confess” or share information that he/she initially believes to be confidential, private or otherwise not for sharing with others. Secrecy is not bad nor good in and of itself. It is merely a factual description of the condition of some information. Now for some good news. There are a number of technological devices and procedures that can be used to enhance one’s privacy. The bad news is that most, if not all, can be easily defeated with other technological advances.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInformation Science Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titlePrivacy enhancing technologyen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages10en_NZ
otago.date.accession2011-01-18 19:59:51en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints1044en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsSecurity Research Groupen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
dc.description.referencesSchneier, Bruce, Applied Cryptography, 2nd Edition, New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1996, ISBN 0-471-11709-9. Schneier, Bruce, E-MAIL SECURITY: How to Keep Your Electronic Messages Private, New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1995, ISBN 0-471-05318-X. Stallings, William, PROTECT YOUR PRIVACY: A Guide for PGP Users, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, Prentice Hall PTR, 1995, ISBN 0-13-185596-4. Bamford, James, The Puzzle Palace, Harmondworth, England, Penguin Books, Ltd., 1983, ISBN 0-14-006748-5. Kahn, David, THE CODE-BREAKERS: The Story of Secret Writing, New York, MacMillan Publishing Company, 1967, ISBN 0-02-560460-0. Cryptologia, Terre Haute, indiana, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 4 issues per year, ISSN 0161-1194. Computers & Security, Oxford, England, Elsevier Advanced Technology, 8 issues per year, ISSN 0167-4048. Bok, Sissela, SECRETS: Concealment & Revelation, Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1986, ISBN 0-19-286072-0.en_NZ
otago.relation.number97/09en_NZ
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