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dc.contributor.authorHook, Maria
dc.date.available2019-02-10T20:54:59Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citation(2016) 47(2) Victoria University of Wellington Law Review 267-282.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/8940
dc.description.abstractA landowner's utility pipe bursts and floods the plaintiff's land. It was reasonably foreseeable that the water would cause flood damage to the plaintiff's land in case of an escape. But it was not reasonably foreseeable that the pipe would burst and, hence, that there would be an escape of water. Can the landowner be liable in nuisance? This paper explores the conceptual implications of the proposition that reasonable foreseeability of harm is an element of liability in nuisance. It argues that, if reasonable foreseeability of harm is an element of nuisance, then nuisance can no longer be thought of as a strict liability tort.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherVictoria University of Wellington Law Schoolen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofVictoria University of Wellington Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectTort Lawen_NZ
dc.subjectNuisanceen_NZ
dc.subjectReasonable Foreseeabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleReasonable Foreseeability of Harm as an Element of Nuisanceen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2019-02-10T20:39:36Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.relation.issue2en_NZ
otago.relation.volume47en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage282en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage267en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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