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dc.contributor.authorGavaghan, Colin
dc.contributor.authorBastani, Amir
dc.date.available2019-03-13T01:09:30Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationC Gavaghan and A Bastani, “Challenges to "a Most Dangerous Doctrine" or a "Fantastic Theory" of Volitional Insanity” VUW Law Review (2016); 47(4).en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9076
dc.description.abstractIn theory, an insanity defence can take two forms: the cognitive form (C-insanity) and the volitional form (V-insanity). The defence of C-insanity recognises that a disordered state of mind can make the ability to understand the nature of an action impossible. On the other hand, V-insanity is recognised in some common law jurisdictions, such as all jurisdictions in Australia except for Victoria and New South Wales, and is a full defence. It recognises that a disordered state of mind can make the exercise of self-control impossible. However, that disordered state of mind does not necessarily affect the understanding of the nature of the act impossible.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherVictoria University of Wellington Law Schoolen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofVictoria University of Wellington Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectInsanityen_NZ
dc.subjectMental capacityen_NZ
dc.subjectCriminal lawen_NZ
dc.subjectDefencesen_NZ
dc.subjectCommon lawen_NZ
dc.titleChallenges To 'A Most Dangerous Doctrine' or a 'Fantastic Theory' of Volitional Insanityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T22:39:17Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.relation.issue4en_NZ
otago.relation.volume47en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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