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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Stephen
dc.date.available2019-03-22T02:49:33Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.citationSmith, SE (2012). “Going through all these things twice”: A brief history of botched executions. Otago Law Review, 12:777–827.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9139
dc.description.abstractThis article considers botched executions throughout history and the legal and policy consequences that have resulted from such incidents. The author adopts a retrospective approach to botched executions and focuses especially on those incidents that have had the greatest effect on society in the development, modification, or abolition of capital punishment. The article begins by discussing definitional issues and establishing what is meant by the term “botched execution,” before exploring the six forms of capital punishment that have most frequently been botched. The author concludes by examining the occurrences and consequences of botched executions through time and across jurisdictions, beginning with examples from ancient times and considering incidents that have occurred in Great Britain and its Empire, in France, and in the United States.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherOtago Law Review Trust Boarden_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofOtago Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectExecutionsen_NZ
dc.subjectCapital Punishmenten_NZ
dc.subjectCriminal Lawen_NZ
dc.subjectGreat Britainen_NZ
dc.subjectThe Commonwealthen_NZ
dc.subjectFranceen_NZ
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_NZ
dc.title'Going Through All These Things Twice': A Brief History of Botched Executionsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2019-03-21T00:14:23Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.relation.volume12en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage827en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage777en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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