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dc.contributor.authorGeddis, Andrew
dc.contributor.editorBedggood, M
dc.contributor.editorGledhill, K
dc.contributor.editorMcIntosh, I
dc.date.available2019-03-22T02:55:51Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citation(2017) The philosophical underpinnings of human rights. In M. Bedggood, K. Gledhill & I. McIntosh (Eds.), International human rights law in Aotearoa New Zealand. Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9146
dc.description.abstractOnce a conversation is started about “human rights”, two things quickly become apparent. First, there is a widespread agreement that human rights matter, and second, that there is extensive disagreement as to exactly what the term means. This chapter represents an effort to bridge this gap between society’s commitment to upholding and honouring human rights and the existence of deep divisions over what it is that is actually being dealt with. The author discusses the meaning of the term “human rights,” the difference between moral human rights and legal human rights, and the generational, cultural and political elements that may affect our understanding of human rights. The chapter concludes that international human rights law matters for New Zealand and effects how New Zealand operates as a country.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherThomson Reutersen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofInternational human rights law in Aotearoa New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectHuman rightsen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectInternational lawen_NZ
dc.subjectPublic lawen_NZ
dc.titleThe Philosophical Underpinnings of Human Rightsen_NZ
dc.typeChapter in Book
dc.date.updated2019-03-20T23:44:13Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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