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dc.contributor.advisorHill, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Elizabeth Grace
dc.date.available2019-03-28T19:55:27Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, E. G. (2019). The Provision of Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Resources in a Post Disaster Environment: The 2015 Nepal Earthquake (Thesis, Master of Planning). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9184en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9184
dc.description.abstractThe involvement of international donors in providing aid to developing countries is well established. Due to the relative instability of governments in developing countries, like Nepal, international donors are increasingly channeling aid through non-governmental organisations (NGO’s). As the high volume of aid channeled through (NGOs) increased during the post-earthquake response in 2015, Nepal adapted its governance structures to control the distribution of aid by these organisations. One sector that is heavily reliant on aid is the water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector. After the April 2015 earthquakes large volumes of aid came in through international and national level non-governmental agencies. In an effort to control the use of aid channeled through these agencies additional frameworks, such as the ‘clustered approach’ and ‘one door’ policy was implemented. Clusters were set up for eleven different sectors to supply targeted resources to those in need. One of the sectors of importance was the WASH sector. The research addresses the perceived success of the WASH sector response and how the post-disaster response frameworks functioned, specifically how the cluster framework aided in the post-disaster response. The thesis analyses the impacts that the post-disaster response frameworks had on the wider response and the relationships between groups within the sector. Societal and political factors that influenced the WASH sector response and the magnitude of influence of these factors in the post-disaster environment are also examined. The thesis outlines the WASH resource coverage pre-April 2015 earthquake and looks at the WASH sector response post-earthquake it also studies the relative change in the access to WASH resources as observed in February and March 2018. Based on the perspectives gathered of laypersons, and representatives from International and National Level Non-Governmental Organisations the thesis finds that the societal and political influences that effect the distribution of WASH resources generally influenced the access to such resources in the post-disaster environment. The frameworks that were employed, such as the ‘cluster’ and the ‘one-door’ policy approach did increase the efficiency, effectiveness and coordination of the post-disaster response. However, the results also showed that the government the relative responsibility and power of local governments to dictate the distribution of aid, heavily influenced the distribution process. As a result, it was discerned that there were groups that received aid at the expense of those who were more in need. While it could be argued that the response was “broadly” successful. the relative power of local government, the influence of wider societal factors and the relative power gradient in Nepalese society, negatively impacted the distribution of WASH resource aid. As a result, there needs to be improvement in both the disaster response frameworks and in the general aid frameworks to reduce the impact of these negative societal and political influences on aid distribution, the distribution of WASH resources.  
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectWater
dc.subjectSaniation
dc.subjectHygiene
dc.subjectWASH
dc.subjectNepal
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.titleThe Provision of Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Resources in a Post Disaster Environment: The 2015 Nepal Earthquake
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-03-28T10:53:58Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Geography
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Planning
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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