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dc.contributor.authorConnell, Simon
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Simon
dc.date.available2019-05-05T21:15:14Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationNew Zealand Universities Law Review, Forthcomingen_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9288
dc.description.abstractDebate over the proper approach to modern contract interpretation continues even in this era of modern contract interpretation where context is always considered. This paper identifies and contrasts two rival approaches to contract interpretation: “prescriptive contextualism” which demands that contract interpretation start with plain meaning, and only then go on to consider textual context, extra-textual context and finally commercial sense; and “holistic contextualism” which involves consideration of those same factors but is not fussy about the order. In setting out the two approaches, the author provides an exposition of the present law of contract interpretation. Then, the author considers the main arguments that can be advanced by proponents of the two approaches, and conclude by offering his own arguments that, the author suggests, tip the scales in favour of holistic contextualism: the prescriptive process inhibits identification of viable interpretation, and is overly dependant on which words are used to start the interpretive process.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherThomson Reutersen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofNew Zealand Universities Law Reviewen_NZ
dc.subjectContract Lawen_NZ
dc.subjectInterpretationen_NZ
dc.subjectContextualismen_NZ
dc.titlePrescriptive and Holistic Contextualism: Emerging Variants of Modern Contract Interpretationen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2019-05-05T05:33:20Z
otago.schoolUniversity of Otago Faculty of Lawen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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