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dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Bronwyn
dc.contributor.authorFairs, Emma Jane
dc.date.available2019-06-03T21:06:57Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationFairs, E. J. (2019). The New Zealand Osteopathic Profession’s Understanding of Continuing Professional Development (Thesis, Master of Health Sciences). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9346en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9346
dc.description.abstractContinuing professional development (CPD) is commonly accepted as the process for improving the competency, and enhancing the knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSA’s) of health professionals. Within the last few decades CPD has become an expected requirement of maintaining the right or licence to continue practice. The aim of this research was to investigate the beliefs and understanding of the New Zealand osteopathic profession in relation to CPD; how they decided what CPD to undertake, what they saw as the perceived benefit of completing CPD, and whether they had any barriers accessing CPD. A survey was sent to all 632 registered osteopaths in New Zealand. The survey asked questions about CPD and also gathered general and professional demographic information. The survey was completed by 48% (n=303) of all registered osteopaths, 67% (n=203) of whom held an annual practicing certificate. Findings demonstrated that over 82% (n=234) of respondents completed CPD because it was a requirement of recertification, but 90% (n=256) also felt motivated to complete CPD because it assisted with clinical practice and improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. Just over half of respondents 52% (n=139) stated they chose CPD based on their clinical focus and particular interests. Practitioners believed theoretical and practical skills and communication skills improved following CPD completion. Barriers to CPD were time (n=212, 71%), cost (n=170, 59%), availability (n=213, 74%), and maintaining a work life balance (n=210, 73%). For 73% (n=191) of respondents, attendance at conferences was the preferred CPD activity, with a further 32% (n=84) preferring informal peer contact and attendance at peer group meetings being very favoured by 37% (n=97). Blogging was the least favoured CPD activity, with 92% (n=240) indicating they did not prefer this as a CPD activity. Male respondents work longer hours in a clinicalsetting, when compared to females, and spent more money on CPD than the female respondents. Findings from this study have shown that osteopaths engaged with CPD for both legislative requirements and also personal reasons. Barriers to CPD include time, cost, availability and work-life balance. This seems to be magnified for female respondents.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectOsteopath
dc.subjectNew Zealand Osteopathy
dc.subjectcontinuing professional development
dc.subjectcompetence
dc.titleThe New Zealand Osteopathic Profession’s Understanding of Continuing Professional Development
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-06-03T04:40:53Z
thesis.degree.disciplineOrthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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