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dc.contributor.advisorKearsley, Geoff
dc.contributor.advisorHoogsteden, Chris
dc.contributor.advisorMorgan, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKliskey, Andrew David
dc.date.available2019-06-07T02:39:50Z
dc.date.copyright1993-12-11
dc.identifier.citationKliskey, A. D. (1993, December 11). Wilderness perception mapping : a geographic information systems (GIS) approach to the application of wilderness perceptions to protected areas management in New Zealand (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9361en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9361
dc.description.abstractIncreasing demands for wilderness experiences, principally through outdoor recreation and tourism, are creating an ever greater need for careful management of natural and pristine areas in order to preserve the natural ecological processes of an area while also permitting appropriate wilderness use. This study addresses these pressures by emphasising the application of varying perceptions of wilderness within a geographic information systems (GIS) framework as an approach to balancing the ecological and experiential conditions that characterise wilderness environments. The specific objective is to delimit the spatial extent of multiple perceptions of wilderness, held by backcountry users, as a means of improving the effectiveness of management approaches, via a GIS framework . A wilderness perception mapping (WPM) methodology is operationalised through two alternative approaches. The first method applies perceptions of wilderness settings, from an attitudinal scale, and maps the spatial extent of these perceptions . This is achieved through a direct overlay process using GIS. The second method utilises multivariate techniques which enable a weighted overlay process to be performed. The initial results obtained from employing the WPM methodology are examined through the application of the two approaches to a case-study, namely North-West Nelson in the South Island of New Zealand. The end products for each approach provide new and useful information that has applicability to both management and research. After comparing the end products, the results for the first method are further analysed with respect to protected areas management. The role and implications of WPM are discussed with reference to wilderness management in North- West Nelson and in New Zealand, and to protected areas management at a broader level.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.titleWilderness perception mapping : a geographic information systems (GIS) approach to the application of wilderness perceptions to protected areas management in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
dc.date.updated2019-06-07T02:39:32Z
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelPhDen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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