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dc.contributor.advisorMaclaurin, James
dc.contributor.advisorLeBuffe, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBlackmore, Briony
dc.date.available2019-08-13T21:36:20Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationBlackmore, B. (2019). Developing Transparency Requirements for the Operation of Criminal Justice Algorithms in New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9540en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9540
dc.description.abstractAs predictive risk algorithms become more commonplace so have concerns about their use. The perceived bias, inaccuracy, and opacity of predictive risk algorithms has given rise to concerns about fairness when used in criminal justice contexts, especially in predicting an offender’s risk of re-offense. Opacity in these algorithms has negative consequences for citizens’ trust in their government, ability to give informed consent and ability to utilise certain rights. Edwards and Veale (2017) have argued that making predictive risk algorithms transparent would go some way toward mitigating these concerns. However, transparency is not a panacea: in fact, it introduces the possibility of offenders “gaming the system”, thereby decreasing the potential accuracy and effectiveness—and indeed, the fairness—of the system. Complete transparency, then, does not guarantee fairness either. With this tension in mind, I explore the justifications for transparency and opacity in predictive risk algorithms. I argue that while neither complete transparency nor complete opacity is desirable, there are certain parts of predictive risk algorithms that are best kept opaque, while others should be transparent. I then propose a set of transparency conditions that should be met when operating algorithms in the criminal justice system.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectArtificial Intelligence
dc.subjectAlgorithms
dc.subjectCriminal Justice
dc.subjectTransparency
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.titleDeveloping Transparency Requirements for the Operation of Criminal Justice Algorithms in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-08-13T04:39:56Z
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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