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dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Hamish
dc.contributor.authorLockton, Katherine
dc.date.available2019-09-03T22:11:45Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationLockton, K. (2019). The Genetic Analysis of Lasaea hinemoa: The Story of an Evolutionary Oddity (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9580en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9580
dc.description.abstractLasaea is a genus of molluscs that primarily consists of minute, hermaphroditic bivalves that occupy rocky shores worldwide. The majority of Lasaea species are asexual, polyploid, direct developers. However, two Australian species are exceptions: Lasaea australis is sexual, diploid and has planktotrophic development, whereas Lasaea colmani is sexual, diploid and direct developing. The New Zealand species Lasaea hinemoa has not been phylogeographically studied. I investigated the phylogeography of L. hinemoa using mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequencing (COIII and ITS2, respectively). Additionally, I investigated population-level structuring around Dunedin using microsatellite markers that I developed. It was elucidated that the individuals that underwent genetic investigation consisted of four clades (Clade I, Clade II, Clade III and Clade IV). Clade I and Clade III dominated in New Zealand and support was garnered through gene sequencing and microsatellite analysis for these clades to represent separate cryptic species, with biogeographic splitting present. Clade II consisted of individuals that had been collected from the Antipodes Island. The Antipodes Island contained individuals from two clades (Clade I and Clade II), with Lasaea from the Kerguelen Islands being more closely related to individuals from Clade II than Clade I was to Clade II. This genetic distinction between Clade I and Clade II seemed to indicate transoceanic dispersal via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) between the Kerguelen Islands and Antipodes Island. Clade IV clustered very distinctly from L. hinemoa, appearing to represent transoceanic dispersal by another Lasaea species.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectPhylogeography
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectLasaea
dc.subjectMollusc
dc.subjectGenetic Analysis
dc.titleThe Genetic Analysis of Lasaea hinemoa: The Story of an Evolutionary Oddity
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-09-03T10:35:13Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineZoology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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