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dc.contributor.authorWinchester, Nivenen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:47Z
dc.date.copyright2005-12en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationWinchester, N. (2005). A classroom tariff setting game (Economics Discussion Papers Series No. 524). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/958en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/958
dc.description.abstractThe author outlines a classroom tariff setting game that allows students to explore the consequences of import tariffs imposed by large countries (countries able to influence world prices). Groups of students represent countries, which are organized into trading pairs. Each group’s objective is to maximize welfare by choosing an appropriate ad valorem tariff that may be changed intermittently throughout the game. The game is built on a computable general equilibrium model, which allows each nation’s utility and terms of trade under alternative tariff regimes to be expressed quantitatively. The exercise encourages students to consider terms of trade improvements and efficiency losses resulting from large-country tariffs, and provides a framework to discuss the Nash equilibrium of a tariff war. The game is a useful supplement to traditional teaching methods.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomics Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/DP_0524.pdfen_NZ
dc.subjectactive learningen_NZ
dc.subjectclassroom experimenten_NZ
dc.subjecttariff settingen_NZ
dc.subjecttariffsen_NZ
dc.subjectInternational Tradeen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHB Economic Theoryen_NZ
dc.titleA classroom tariff setting gameen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages21en_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-02-02en_NZ
otago.schoolEconomicsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints201en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
dc.description.referencesBagwell, K., and R. W. Staiger. 1999. An economic theory of GATT. American Economic Review 89 (March): 215-48. Becker, W. E., and M. Watts. 1995. Teaching tools: Teaching methods in undergraduate economics. Economic Inquiry 33 (October): 692-700. _______ 1996. Chalk and talk: A national survey on teaching undergraduate economics. American Economic Review 86 (May): 448-53. Beckman, S. R. 2003. Cournot and Bertrand games. Journal of Economic Education 34 (Winter): 27-35. Holt, C. A., and M. Capra. 2000. Classroom games: a prisoner’s dilemma. Journal of Economic Education 31 (Summer): 229-36. Krugman, P. R., and M. Obstfeld. 2003. International economics: Theory and policy. 6th ed. Boston: Addison Wesley. McMillan, J. 1986. A game-theoretic view of international trade negotiations: Implications for developing countries. In J. Whalley, ed., Developing countries and the global trading system: Volume I. 26-44. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Mayer, W. 1981. Theoretical considerations on negotiated tariff adjustments. Oxford Economic Papers 33(March): 135-53. Meister, J. P. 1999. Oligopoly-An in-class economic game. Journal of Economic Education 30 (Fall): 383-91. Ortmann, A. 2003. Bertrand price undercutting: A brief classroom demonstration. Journal of Economic Education 34 (Winter): 21-6. Oxoby, R. J. 2001. A monopoly classroom experiment. Journal of Economic Education 32 (Spring): 160-8. Yarbrough, B. V., and R. M. Yarbrough. 2003. The world economy: Trade and finance. 6th ed. Mason, Ohio: South-Western/Thomson Learning.en_NZ
otago.relation.number524en_NZ
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