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dc.contributor.authorFielding, Daviden_NZ
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Sebastianen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:55Z
dc.date.copyright2005-05en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationFielding, D., & Torres, S. (2005). Cows and conquistadors: a comment on the colonial origins of comparative development (Economics Discussion Papers Series No. 504). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/983en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/983
dc.description.abstractRobust estimation of the impact of political institutions on economic development requires the identification of valid instruments for institutional quality. Acemoglu et al. [2001] introduced the use of colonial settler mortality rates as such an instrument. Our paper develops a more eclectic theory of colonial development, and compares the performance of the settler mortality model to alternatives incorporating instruments reflecting the production structure of colonial economies. Ceteris paribus, colonies with a natural comparative advantage in pastoral agriculture were more likely to experience European settlement that led to non-extractive institutions. Some – but not all – of Acemoglu et al.’s conclusions are robust to the use of a wider set of instruments.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEconomics Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.subjecteconomic developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectInstitutionsen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHC Economic History & Conditionsen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHB Economic Theoryen_NZ
dc.titleCows and conquistadors: a comment on the colonial origins of comparative developmenten_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages34en_NZ
otago.date.accession2005-11-22en_NZ
otago.schoolEconomicsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints54en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsEconomicsen_NZ
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otago.relation.number504en_NZ
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