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dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Matthewen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorStanger, Nigelen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Elaineen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:05:59Z
dc.date.copyright2004-12en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationGleeson, M., Stanger, N., & Ferguson, E. (2004). Design strategies for GUI items with touch screen based information systems: assessing the ability of a touch screen overlay as a selection device (Information Science Discussion Papers Series No. 2004/02). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/994en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/994
dc.description.abstractTouch screens are a popular method of interaction with information systems embedded in public kiosks. Typical information systems are used on desktop PCs and therefore restricted to having a mouse as the selection device used to interact with the system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how effective a touch screen overlay is in selecting typical graphical user interface (GUI) items used in information systems. A series of tests were completed involving multi-directional point and select tasks. A mouse, being the standard selection device, was also tested so the results of the touch screen could be compared. The GUI items tested were a button, check box, combo box and a text box. The results showed that the touch screen overlay was not suitable in terms of selecting small targets with a size of 4mm or less. The touch screen overlay was slower and had higher error rate compared to the mouse. There was no significant difference in throughput between a touch screen overlay and mouse. The mouse was rated easier to use and easier to make accurate selections with. The touch screen had higher arm, wrist and finger fatigue. This indicates that a touch screen overlay used only with a finger is not a practical selection device to use with interfaces containing small targets.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInformation Science Discussion Papers Seriesen_NZ
dc.subjecttouch screen overlayen_NZ
dc.subjectmouseen_NZ
dc.subjectpointing devicesen_NZ
dc.subjectFitts’ Lawen_NZ
dc.subjectperformance evaluationen_NZ
dc.subjectGUI itemsen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA75 Electronic computers. Computer scienceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshQA76 Computer softwareen_NZ
dc.titleDesign strategies for GUI items with touch screen based information systems: assessing the ability of a touch screen overlay as a selection deviceen_NZ
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages10en_NZ
otago.date.accession2005-12-02en_NZ
otago.schoolInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.place.publicationDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.identifier.eprints25en_NZ
otago.school.eprintsInformation Scienceen_NZ
otago.school.eprintsHuman Nutritionen_NZ
dc.description.referencesApple Computer, Inc (2004). Apple Human Interface Guidelines. Pg. 155 - 192. Bender, G. (1999). Touch screen performance as a function of the duration of auditory feedback and target size. Liberal Arts and Sciences, Wichita State University: 7. Douglas, S., Mithal, A. (1994). The effect of reducing homing time on the speed of a finger-controlled isometric pointing device. Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI ’94 Conference Proceedings: 411 - 416. Ferguson, E., Gibson, R. (2004). Development of an innovative tool to improve complementary feeding practices in the south-east Asian and pacific regions. Dunedin, Univeristy of Otago, New Zealand. ISO (1998). Ergonomic requirements for office work with visual display terminals (VDTs). Part 9 - Requirements for non keyboard input devices (ISO 9241-9). International Organization for Standardization. Douglas, S., Kirkpatrick, A., MacKenzie, I. (1999). Testing pointing device performance and user assessment with the ISO 9241, Part 9 standard. Proceedings of the ACM Conference in Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI ’99, New York: ACM, 1999. MacKenzie, S., Jusoh, S. (2001). An Evaluation of Two Input Devices for Remote Pointing. Proceedings of the Eighth IFIP Working Conference on Engineering for Human-Computer Interaction EHCI 2001: 235-249. MacKenzie, I., Sellen, A., & Buxton, W. (1991). A comparison of input devices in elemental pointing and dragging tasks. Proceedings of the CHI ’91 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 161-166). New York: ACM. Sears, A., Shneiderman, B. (1991). High precision touchscreens: design strategies and comparisons with a mouse. International Journal of Man-Machine Studies 34: 593-613.en_NZ
otago.relation.number2004/02en_NZ
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